Tag: Iranian protests

A year after Jina’s murder

On the occasion of the anniversary of the inception of the “Women, Life, Freedom” movement, the Islamic regime deployed a substantial military presence in an attempt to instill fear among the populace. The citizens, however, keenly assess the distribution of power but have shed their apprehension. They no longer live in fear, but they are acutely aware that a formidable and challenging struggle lies ahead.

The Rise of Students: Catalysts for Change in Iran

Undoubtedly, the social and political developments in Iran over the past few decades bear the unmistakable imprints of the leftist student movement. The influence of students extends far beyond their union demands, as they have consistently and relentlessly inserted themselves into every discourse and demand, both big and small, within Iran’s political landscape. However, this article focuses solely on examining the role of the student movement in the mass uprisings aimed at toppling the Islamic government.

Strike Under Repression: Iranian Oil Industry Project Workers’ Challenges

Project workers in the oil, gas, and petrochemical industry face a unique set of challenges when it comes to organizing and mobilizing for better working conditions. These temporary contract workers, often lack the stability and support of permanent employees, making them vulnerable to financial and political pressure. Workers experience different forms of organization that are often innovative and may even have the chance to be tried once. However, project workers have developed innovative ways to withstand these challenges.

Iran: Nationwide protest against Bioterrorist Attacks on schoolgirls

In a powerful display of collective action, teachers across Iran have taken to the streets to demand the safety and security of female students in their schools. Undeterred by the repressive forces and uniforms of the Islamic Council in Tehran, these educators have rallied in dozens of cities, from Mashhad to Isfahan, to decry the spread of chemical attacks on their students.

Poisoning, Violence, and Oppression: The Islamic Republic’s War on Women

The “Women, Life, Freedom” movement, which involved removing the hijab, tearing pictures of Khamenei and Khomeini, and chanting slogans mostly in girls’ schools, has infuriated the regime to such an extent that they have given the green light to use their powers to retaliate against this uprising. This is a longstanding behavior in the history of the Islamic Republic, with examples including serial murders, gang killings, and acid attacks against women in Isfahan. These actions are deeply disturbing and cause terror among the people.

A New Vision for Iran:
The Charter of Change

The demands presented in this charter encompass a range of social, political, and economic changes necessary for Iran. These demands seek to establish rights such as free expression, equal opportunities for women and LGBTQ+ community, better working conditions, job security, and an end to discrimination and corruption. The signatories of this charter hold the belief that the Iranian people can accomplish these changes with their abundant resources and educated populace. They also view such progress as essential for a prosperous future.

The Aesthetics of the post-Aban Uprising

Here we talk about Marxist aesthetics, which does not examine a mechanical opposition of form and substance or the primacy of spirit over matter, and neither it examines the objective and subjective aspects of phenomena separate from each other; but, as a unique aesthetic, tries to examine the relationship between parts and the totality, the general and the particular features of things to make [these relationships] visible to those who cannot see it otherwise. For a better cognition of phenomena, we need a Kantian aesthetics of power of judgment. Therefore, in Marxist aesthetics, one can find traces of Kant’s idealistic aesthetics elaborated in his book the Critique of the Power of Judgment.

Thanks, but Iranian people don’t want a Zelensky!

The revolutionary rise of “Women, Life, Freedom” has resulted in opposition from workers, women activists, and young people seeking freedom and equality not just against the capitalist government, but also against the manufacturing pro-Western leaders and alternatives. The freedom and equality movement seeks nothing less than the end of capitalist rule and the achievement of happiness and freedom.

Iranian Feminist May Face Death Penalty for Protesting Compulsory Hijab

Mozhgan Keshavarz, an Iranian feminist, was arrested in early 2019 along with two other women’s rights activists, Munirah Arabshahi and Yasman Ariani (mother and daughter), for protesting against the compulsory hijab. Before their arrest, these three had published a video on social media giving flowers to women in the metro without hijab on 8 March. The three were charged with “gathering and coordinating with the aim of acting against national security,” “propaganda against the government,” and “promoting and encouraging prostitution through the promotion of not wearing hijab.”

Voices of Iranian Educators:
Insights on Challenges and Demands

Rasool Bodaghi is a teacher and a member of the Union of Iranian Educators. Bodaghi has dedicated his life to improving modern education and ensuring that all Iranian children receive a quality, free, and equal education. In a recent note written from Evin prison, he spoke about the demands of teachers over the years and explained the reasons for the government’s repressive actions towards them.

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